Interview with Sheriff James Clark
QUESTION 10
INTERVIEWER:

BUT WHAT DID YOU THINK ABOUT THE WHOLE ISSUE OF THE RIGHT TO VOTE IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY AT THAT TIME?

Sheriff James Clark:

They were, the blacks were allowed to vote, register to vote when they could qualify, according to the laws of the state of Alabama. After the federal registrars took over I sent several prisoners that were felons, down with jail uniforms on, printed, Property of Dallas County Jail, sent them to the federal registrars and they were registered to vote. I did not believe that people with that sort of reputation should not—should be allowed to vote. Nonresidents were there in the lines, children below the age of eighteen were in the line, and it was just a complete farce. Even after the federal judge ruled that they had to be registered, they wouldn't go into the registrar's office at all. They'd go up to the door and put on an act like they were being turned back for—that was for the benefit of the cameras, and they—it was just a complete farce as far as the whole act was and the press, the media, television, went right along with it.