Interview with Judge Charles Clark
QUESTION 12
INTERVIEWER:

UM AS THE CASE WENT THROUGH TO THE APPEALS COURT AND IT BECAME APPARENT THAT THE COURTS WERE GOING TO INSIST THAT JAMES MEREDITH BE ENROLLED, UM, THERE WAS A LOT OF PUBLIC CONCERN. PEOPLE IN MISSISSIPPI FELT VERY EMOTIONAL ABOUT THIS. WHY WAS THAT, DO YOU HAVE A SENSE OF WHY OLD MISS WAS SO IMPORTANT?

Judge Charles Clark:

From, from a historical standpoint, not from a lawyer's standpoint, I had the perception that uh, a number of people in the state, both alumni of the university and people who had never attended uh, saw the issue uh, as being made at the University. Uh, an issue of, of whether the state was going to move from a society that had been very separated uh, to one of integration. And I think that James Meredith made himself a symbol of that integration movement and I think that this provoked strong feelings from people who were both in the state who both within the state were from Old Miss and who had no association with the University, but simply saw the University as, as a uh, place where the uh, act of integration would take place.