Interview with Judge Charles Clark
QUESTION 21
INTERVIEWER:

NO I THINK THAT YOU WERE SAYING THAT IT BECAME, MISSISSIPPI BECAME A KIND OF A WHIPPING BOY, AND ALMOST UM…

Judge Charles Clark:

Oh, well, that's sort of the permanent situation in Mississippi I think. Mississippi is constantly held up to be the bad example in race relations in this country. Uh, I wish there was some way to change that. Uh, I can, I can easily realize the historical reasons for that. I, I would say at the same time though that Mississippi contains the same number of people of both races, of good virtue and high morals and earnest desires for, for peace and harmony and good will and all the other things and it uh, to get set into a context of, of uh, expectations of others is, is disconcerting to say the least, I think it's more than that, I don't I don't have the right word at the tip of my tongue. It's disheartening at times that this idea won't go away, that this perception of the state as rural and backwards and unyielding and inveterate is uh, is wrong. I think that there is uh no more racial prejudice in Mississippi than there is in Boston. I think it manifests itself in different ways.