Interview with Kenneth Clark
QUESTION 12
SAM POLLARD:

One of the demands was that they felt that Howard should have a strong commitment to the Black community.

KENNETH CLARK:

Should have a what?

SAM POLLARD:

That Howard should have a strong commitment to the Black community outside of the campus. My question to you is, did you feel that Howard had already, were they doing that? Was the school doing that? Was the school involved in the community as far as you were concerned?

KENNETH CLARK:

My personal feeling is I don't see how it would be possible for the school not to be related or involved or concerned with the Black community. The purpose of Howard University was to communicate and educate the students and the community and the nation. I remember as an undergraduate that I would listen to the lawyers of the law school talk about the legal approaches to obtaining racial justice. Well this to me was a commitment to the Black community and of course the whole Brown decision cases came out of Howard University's law school. I certainly learned a great deal about American injustices. The racial problems and an intelligent approach to try to deal with them from people like Ralph Bunche, Frank Frazier, and a group of good, solid, intelligent faculty people. To me this was commitment. I remember as a senior at Howard being arrested. It was a group of my classmates when we went down to the capital building and protested against their not permitting Blacks to eat in the restaurant there. Though Ralph Bunche and others on the faculty fought very hard to keep us from being expelled.

SAM POLLARD:

OK, we're going to take a break. Camera Roll out.



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