Interview with William Coleman
QUESTION 15
INTERVIEWER:

DO YOU REMEMBER ANY PARTTCUIAR EXPERIENCES WITH THE MOOT TRIALS THAT YOU UH, CARRIED OUT?

William Coleman:

Well I remember experiences where we would go up there on our uh, Saturday and a person like Spotchwood Robinson who argued one of the case, would make his argument. Uh, people like uh, Charlie Quick who taught at the uh, Howard Law School, a gentleman named Ranson who taught there, and other people who taught there, and others of us would be up on the court and we would ask him questions which would really rip him to pieces. Uh, I think uh, you'd find that by the time those gentlemen got to the Supreme Court to argue there wasn't a question that they hadn't been asked during some of those dry runs as we used to call them. And they were, you know, they were really tough, hard-hitting sessions. And so often and when the students were around, uh, if you would make some type of concession, uh… sometimes they would even, you know, boo. Uh… but, you know, they… I guess the youth doesn't understand that you know, to win cases sometimes you have to concede something. But basically it was a really hard work uh, and it went on for days in and days out.