Interview with William Coleman
QUESTION 23
INTERVIEWER:

IN THAT TEN YEARS THAT WE TALKED ABOUT, FROM 54 TO SELMA… WHAT IMPACT DO YOU THINK THE DECISION REALLY HAD? DO YOU THINK IT WAS THE… IT WAS A STARTING PLACE?

William Coleman:

It was a starting place. Because thereafter, no politician who also wanted to be on the moral side of the issue could be urging segregation. Now there were some. And look at history today. Those people have disappeared from the scene. The Wallaces, the Bull, uh, Connor, they're gone. On the other hand those that lead the movement, the Andy Youngs, the Thurgood Marshall, they have taken their place in this country and they are now leaders. I think that should teach the young a great lesson. That when there is a great moral issue that even though it is unpopular at the time, if you will put your skills and your talents to make the change that this country ultimately will accept you and you will become the leaders of the next generation and those who will resist will fail. I think that's a great lesson to be learned from the Civil Rights Movement, what happened in this country from 1940 through 1965,