Interview with Slim Coleman
QUESTION 10
JAMES A. DeVINNEY:

Hold up just a second, you got pickup right in the middle of that story.




JAMES A. DeVINNEY:

So you're going to pick up the story where you introduce Harold Washington--


JAMES A. DeVINNEY:

I'll give you the cue

SLIM COLEMAN:

I won't need it.

JAMES A. DeVINNEY:

And introduce the Mayor.

SLIM COLEMAN:

We talked about all the issues and it was my job to introduce Harold Washington, then the congressman. Ah, so I said, "Well, I want you to imagine," and I used a sister who actually spoke, and I said, "Marian, if, ah, if the police had just broken into your office, you know, like they do, they just knock down the door and come in like their looking for somebody and tear everything up and you're so angry you went down to the mayor's office and you walked up to the mayor's office and that little desk there where the sergeant sits and say, "Sergeant, I want to see the mayor." And the sergeant said, "All right" and he went back, ah, and you were waiting for somebody else to come out, ah, and tell you to go away and that they really didn't want to hear your problem, ah, and, ah, instead out came the mayor and he looked him in the face and he said, "Harold, I got a problem." Well, Harold put his head down on the desk and he couldn't stop, he couldn't stop laughing at everybody and he started yelling and cheering and there was actually about five minutes worth of ovation, ah, and then finally Harold got up to speak and he said, "Well, my momma always told me to, ah, come when I was called." And then he gave a speech, which he called a Tale of Two Cities, ah, which really was a keynote, ah, for, ah, what the campaign was to be for the next nine months. He said that we had Reagan in Washington, D.C. and we had a Reaganite posing as a Democrat, ah, on the fifth floor of City Hall and that really was the issue that the machine was, instead of the cities coming together, ah, and, then we're going to say, "No" to Ronald Reagan and what Ronald Reagan is doing to the cities, that we had, under the name of being Democrats, that the machine and Jane Byrne actually said it, "Let's give Reagan's policies a chance." You know, we said, "Who's going to win when Reagan's policies give us a chance?" And he said that was the Tale of Two Cities and we began, really, in some ways, began the campaign right there in, ah, April, ah, of 1982.