Interview with John Conyers
QUESTION 38
INTERVIEWER:

Do you, do you, aside from Baraka's speech do you remember Jesse's speech for example, the--

JOHN CONYERS:

Well, Baraka, Baraka and Jesse I think were probably, ah, were probably the most notable of--and it left us, it actually left us so far out that we didn't have any place to pragmatically work after we left the convention, ah, ah, it's like, it's like a group of people coming together and saying "What if?" and "How do we plan this?" It was, it was, good to know that there were so much, ah, dynamism, and, and hope out there. But the, ah, and we promised to come back again, and there were, ah, resolutions of how we were, ah going to direct ourselves, but they kind of faded away. What we saw happening was the Civil Rights Movement began to continue to move its way forward, and the political activity began to catch on. More and more Blacks the Civil Rights Act and the Voter Rights act began to kick in, and actually the numbers of Black elected officials, in the Congressional Black Caucus, but at the local level which was in some ways was equally as important.