Interview with David Dawley
QUESTION 16
DALE ROSEN:

Let me ask you is there anything else that you feel that you need to tell us about that experience?

DALE ROSEN:

No, we don't need him to tell us that.

DALE ROSEN:

Yeah. CAMERA CREW 2: Well, the idea is that, was that some point was for you, the Civil Rights Movement any less valuable, after that, was it any less--

DALE ROSEN:

A place you wanted to be? CAMERA CREW 2: And something you wanted to fight for? Did it diminish, don't, I'm not putting words in your mouth--

DAVID DAWLEY:

I understand your question. CAMERA CREW 2: Yeah, because it changed you, it affected you because you still speak about, you know, how did that bring you to--

DALE ROSEN:

How did that moment change your feelings about being involved in the Civil Rights Movement?

DAVID DAWLEY:

I don't know if I can answer you within the film that you have.

DALE ROSEN:

That's our problem. That's our problem.


DALE ROSEN:

How did that moment in Greenwood or the march itself change how you felt about being part of the Civil Rights Movement?

DAVID DAWLEY:

I hate to, the immediate impact was on two levels. It was the emotional and then there was the, ah, the intellectual, you know, what did we do with the experience. And emotionally, ah, certainly there was created a, a distance. We didn't know what we should do, but again we were activists, we were interested in changing the United States, ah, so we listened to what SNCC was saying and there was a sense that this was a time when Blacks had the right to define the movement and that Blacks would lead the strategy. And The strategy coming out of Black Power from SNCC was that Blacks should organize with Blacks and Whites should organize with Whites. I accepted that strategy. My friends accepted that strategy so we moved on to work with Whites on issues that we felt we should work with. In the next year, that was not civil rights, that was Vietnam**. After that, um, I ended up as an organizer in the Black community believing that I should organize with Whites against the peak of Black Power, ah, accepting that Blacks had the right to work with Blacks, but I met up with people in Chicago, um, and we felt despite that, um, there were things that we could do together that weren't going to happen that needed to get done, changes that needed to occur, so that's what we did.