Interview with Dave Dennis
QUESTION 16
INTERVIEWER:

OK, UM, TAKE YOU NOW AND UH [overlap] SPEAK TO ME NOW ABOUT UM, MEDGAR'S DEATH AND, AND IT'S AN IMPACT ON BLACK MISSISSIPPIANS AND THE REST OF THE PEOPLE.

Dave Dennis:

That was the first, uh Medgar's death uh, brought about I think for the first time in I know in the Jackson area, and other place too, there was real anger among uh, black people. Extreme violence, on the day that Medgar was uh funeraled , I mean there was violence, I mean there was no way to predict it. There was a different element of people who had never participated in the movement before. Uh, the guys off the street who were just angry you know who that, at that time is we had very little contact with in the Jackson area. Uh, we had mostly worked in church, through churches, we had worked through students young people and then just people in general, you know, but the street people we had not really worked with because they didn't want to have anything to do with us, because they always felt that they could not cope with the non violence, not that they disagreed with what the movement its just that the tactics that we used. You know on that particular day, that uh group of people uh decide to speak out** in their own way, and that's what they did and that's where the violent eruptions occurred at that time is, and uh but they did have enough respect that they listened to people and they were able to control it to some extent once we got into dealing with it and you know and things. But that was anger, the kind of type of anger that you saw in uh, that we experienced in Watts, and in uh Harlem, twice.