Interview with Dave Dennis
QUESTION 19
INTERVIEWER:

JACKSON SEEMED TO, TO KIND OF VACILLATE FOR A WHILE AFTER THAT UM, SOME PEOPLE SAY THAT, THAT THERE WAS POSSIBLY AN EFFORT WITHIN EVEN FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO KINDOF DIFFUSE WHAT WAS GOING ON THERE. DO YOU HAVE ANY SENSE OF WHAT WAS GOING ON AT THAT TIME IN THE MOVEMENT, WHY IT BEGAN TO KINDOF NOT, DIDN'T CONTINUE TO DEVELOP?

Dave Dennis:

Well one of the things that occurred is some of the leadership blamed, one of the things that occurred after the death of Medgar Evers, I think that um might have resulted in the diffusion of what one might say is the damping of the fire that existed there was the, was the fact that the decision on the part of the COFO peoples SNCC, CORE people primarily to sort of back out. The reason why they decided to back out was because uh, there was a conflict between the NAACP and uh, the COFO people and we felt that, very strongly that that was not worth to cause dissention in the community. Uh, but the organizations fighting over who was going to get the largest piece of the pie in terms of responsibility of the demonstrations which is, which is crazy we felt at that time. So we sort of backed out. We were the activists, the NAACP at that time were more for saying that quiet things down, I mean lets move slowly, lets do it through different means other than demonstrations and that kinds of things, Well that was fine, and went back to our old agenda, of voter registration and community organization in the rural areas, and I think that is what occurred, and that was what slowed things down, because the, the demonstrations the things that pushed the fall were the SNCC/CORE people who were in the area at that time, and Medgar, who was not against it, you know, uh, at all. And that's what I think made the changes, and so the Jackson movement just sort of died away at that time, or what you might say uh went to sleep for a while after that incident

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

OK THAT WAS A CAMERA ROLLOUT ON 349.