Interview with Dave Dennis
QUESTION 34
INTERVIEWER:

OK, UM, SPEAKING ABOUT GOING THROUGH THAT, THAT KINDOF DANGER EVERY DAY, TALK TO ME ABOUT THE COMERADERY OF PEOPLE HERE, HOW IMPORTANT THAT WAS, THAT THERE WAS SOMETHING SPECIAL ABOUT MISSISSIPPI. PEOPLE SEEMED TO, TO, TO KINDOF COME TOGETHER, THEY FORMED THIS UNITED FRONT, THERE WAS A KIND—YOU, BOB, UH, UH, AND, AND OTHER GROUPS, IT WAS THIS COMING TOGETHER THAT WAS DIFFERENT. TALK TO ME ABOUT THAT.

Dave Dennis:

The uh, the relationship that the workers had and the people had in the state of Mississippi was totally different from any other place I'd worked. Uh, I think it had a lot to do with the fact is we didn't separate ourselves by organizational lines, we uh, sort of, you know, shed it, those shields, those coats, those cloaks that we, uh, wore, it's whether you're CORE or whether you're SNCC whether you were SCLC or whatever. When you came into the state to work on the voter registration programs, the ministerial groups, whatever you were you became a part of COFO, which was a state, a people's group. And whatever happened to someone over here, I don't care whether it was being manned by so called CORE workers, it was COFO as far as we were concerned. So when anything happened is you always felt the camaraderie, the brotherhood, sisterhood and we were very much, we were very close to the local people. Because in those areas we lived with the local people, we were with them every day, I mean the workers, and we dealt with organizing and putting people and helping people to become leaders in control of their own destiny in organization wise. Like the Miss Fannie Lou Hamer, and Mrs. N. Dubons and others and Ms. Victoria Grays and all the people like that is came out of those communities and we developed them and they all formed their own organizations with no real association of national groups whereby they were dictated to by outside groups nothing of that nature. They make their own rules, their own uh regulations and things like that is. And they moved at their pace or we moved their pace of everybody sort of moved together. And we had meetings, decision making meetings everyone participated. Although I must admit on some decisions uh there were a few of us, Bob or myself, or both of us did sort of shove things down sometimes to get things moving in certain direction that maybe was not understood at the time.