Interview with Charles Diggs
QUESTION 5
INTERVIEWER:

WOULD YOU TALK TO US ABOUT GETTING INVOLVED IN THE TILL CASE BECAUSE YOU FIRST OF ALL THOUGHT OF YOURSELF AS BEING A CONGRESSMAN AT LARGE FOR THE BLACK COMMUNITY, FOR BLACK AMERICANS, AND ALSO BECAUSE YOU THOUGHT THAT BEING THERE AS A REPRESENTATIVE OF CONGRESS MIGHT BE ABLE TO INSURE A BETTER UH, MORE HONEST MORE FAIR TRIAL. CAN YOU TALK ABOUT THAT AND OTHER THINGS THAT GOT YOU INVOLVED IN THE TILL CASE?

Charles Diggs:

Well, when I read about the Till eh the Emmett Till case er involving this young boy that had been fished out of the Tallahatchie River um all er mutilated er because he as I understood it dared to talk back to er white people er down in that community, I became immediately er interested uh first of all because it was Mississippi uh and which was the uh, the bottom line for the arch segregationists in the United States. Uh, and secondly, uh again, it was the home state of my, my parent, my father, my, and my grandfather and all the people on the Diggs side of the family. And, uh, and thirdly, I thought that, um, being a member of Congress uh, and being a pioneer member of Congress, uh that uh, uh, I had a, I had a special um, security kind of uh, of dimension there that uh, could serve the purpose well. And be a uh, a witness to the uh, execution of uh, or the prosecution of a case of this type and be able to uh speak first hand about it all over the country and back in Congress. Uh, hopefully, um with an enhancement that would uh, uh, be uh, in back of laws that uh, would uh correct the system and, and give inspiration to, to other interested parties all over the country.