Interview with John Doar
QUESTION 15
INTERVIEWER:

I WONDER IF YOU COULD TALK A LITTLE BIT ABOUT, THIS IS, THIS IS PICKING UP ON AN EARLIER THOUGHT. YOU MENTIONED MR. STEPTO GOING TO SEE HERBERT LEE, UM, AMZIE, I WAS THINKING OF AMZIE MOORE, YOU MENTIONED MEDGAR EVERS, COULD YOU, WHAT DID YOU FEEL ABOUT THE KIND OF WORK THAT THEY WERE DOING, HOW DID YOU FEEL ABOUT THEIR POSITION, THEIR COURAGE?

John Doar:

Well they were marvelous people, I mean they were the, the people that we met, the Civil Rights lawyers, the black citizens, men and women, that we met in the rural South, were just marvelous individuals. I mean, they were, uh, they were hard workers, they were friendly, they were, they were, uh, remarkably tolerant, and uh, they, uh, uh, we just, we just had great affection, great respect for the people we knew, and, and of course we came to know a great many of them because our methods of investigation was to go out in the field ourselves and talk to people. And uh, when Bob Owen and I were down there on that trip we, I think we probably spent ten days in the field just in one trip, I think I usually spent a hundred and seventy-five, a hundred and fifty, a hundred and seventy five days a year in the South, and many of my lawyers did the same. Uh, we left Washington, we always left on Friday night and came back two weeks in the Sunday nights, so we were gone a full sixteen days.