Interview with Ivanhoe Donaldson
QUESTION 15
INTERVIEWER:

WAS IT, I'VE HEARD IT SAID THAT IT WAS, THAT A LOT OF THE CYNICISM AND SO FORTH CAME OUT OF THE FACT THAT FOLKS THOUGHT THAT WHAT IT DID WAS, IT SOLD MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. AS A LEADER, AND A PROPHET, AND NOT, AND DIDN'T DO SO MUCH FOR, FOR THE ISSUES THAT WERE INVOLVED.

Ivanhoe Donaldson:

Well, how do you separate one from the other? There's no question that the march on Washington clearly established Martin Luther King as a major personality in the American, you know, political scene. But what was that this personality symbolized? You know—this personality was about a social struggle, voter registration, civil rights, jobs, so that I can't separate them. I think that probably where the march may sometimes be historically distorted the fight of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party at the ah, ah,‘64 Democratic Party convention was more symbolic of a real political rift and a real political shift in the civil rights movement about the capability of traditional structures to change. The March on Washington was an advocacy program, a public rallying, while other things were an attempt for an institutional change and I think there's a big difference. It's hard to be critical of public advocacies and public rallying; it's the only was the public has to demonstrate even in a hypocritical sense that they're prepared to emotionally support something.