Interview with Emory Douglas
QUESTION 17
LOUIS MASSIAH:

Huey Newton was arrested, shot and arrested in October of '67. And there were a number of rallies that took place afterwards, one at Alameda Courthouse. Can you talk something of the feelings that you experienced at those rallies, to see so many people there gathered in support of Huey Newton, facing the state. That was a pretty big deal.

EMORY DOUGLAS:

Yeah, well, you know, you got the, ah, the feeling that there was a camaraderie there. That there was a unity of ideals on the, ah, issue of police brutality and murder.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Let's just do that once again because of the car.

EMORY DOUGLAS:

You got the feeling of there was, ah, unity of ideals, a camaraderie there. That people were, ah, ah, ah, had a unity of ideals around the issue of community control of police. You had this, ah, also had the feeling that, ah, that there was, you know, that you could, ah, within the numbers and amount of people, that we could overcome a lot of the difficulties. You had a, ah, positive, ah, energy, that you could say that existed, that carried over not only into, ah, there, but carried over into developing and people becoming a part of the, ah, programs themselves. So, it, it, it was a carry-over, from not just people coming out to support Huey, and the, and the, and the, and what was happening at the courthouse, but also becoming involved in, in, in what was happening in the community.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

OK, stop.