Interview with Minnie Dunlap
QUESTION 22
SAM POLLARD:

OK, Mrs. Dunlap, you know, you're from Yazoo, Mississippi, what was the difference in terms of how White people reacted toward you in the South as opposed to how they acted toward you when you came to Chicago? Just tell me a little bit.

MINNIE DUNLAP:

OK. In the South, White people liked you, they liked you, and they would go all out to help you or do something for you. But when you get, when I got here to Chicago I found that to be different. But if they didn't like you, they say they didn't like you.

SAM POLLARD:

OK, let's do it again, let's start it again.

MINNIE DUNLAP:

In the South, White people, if they liked you, they like you, and they will go all the way out to help you or do something for you. But if they didn't like you, they would say they didn't like you, they would not pretend like they liked you if they didn't. But here in Chicago, it was quite different. You know, you, you'd be around White people here and they pretend like they are all ready for you and all good with you and anything that you did they are ready to help you to do it, but once you start to do that, then the whole attitude of them change and they move away from you and after this that you are somebody that they don't want to be around, or somebody that they don't even know.

SAM POLLARD:

OK, good. Cut.