Interview with Minnie Dunlap
QUESTION 23
SAM POLLARD:

Now it really seems, Mrs. Dunlap, that they did a lot of marches into White sections to bring, or bring about the, talk about the issue of open housing. Now you didn't go, what were you doing but when you watched it on TV and you watched the hostility, what were you thinking, what were you feeling?

MINNIE DUNLAP:

I felt angry, I felt sad--

SAM POLLARD:

You have to tell me that, "I didn't march, I was cooking."

MINNIE DUNLAP:

Oh. I didn't march, the Saturday before the march was, I sta- stay in and cook 200 dinners and by that Sunday I was sick because I have a, I have a breathing problem, so I was sick that Sunday. But when I watched it on TV I got angry, I got sad, I got upset. You know when I watch that kind of ho- hostility and that kind of prejudiceness that I did not understand, so I just couldn't see why they would do that. And I, and looking at that I said, "Gee, I'm not as nonviolent as I think I am," especially and Dr. King wanted us to be nonviolent 'cause if I had been there and they had threw those rotten eggs and had spit on me I think I would have just hit back**.

SAM POLLARD:

Great, good.