Interview with Virginia Durr
QUESTION 8
INTERVIEWER:

WHY DO YOU THINK THAT, THAT, THAT, THAT IT WAS THAT THE WHITE WOMEN WERE WILLING TO BE SO MUCH MORE HELPFUL THAN THE WHITE MEN?

Virginia Durr:

Well, I don't think it was exactly the desire to be helpful, I think it was the desire to have somebody cook and clean up and nurse the children and uh, you know, do the work. You see the whole thing about the system of segregation you have to get to the bottom of it, and from slavery on the whole thing has been to have cheap labor. I mean to have somebody else do the dirty work. Well if you go back into history back to Pharaoh uh, you find that the great desire of men, mankind or you even take an African chief in Africa, the great desire of mankind is to have somebody else to do the dirty work. And a lots of time in the feminist movement you hear all the time about how the women do the dirty work and the men don't. But uh, I do think that uh in the South, particularly the great, the whole motivation of, of segregation and uh slavery was to keep cheap labor, and I must say that uh if you've ever lived in a big house, with uh, which I used to do when my grandmother was alive, uh where you were waited on all the time it's very luxurious. When it was a hundred and five outside it's very nice to have somebody do all the dirty work and let you sit there and uh, you know, do nothing. And uh, it doesn't, I often have arguments with black friends that I have in the South because I really think that they feel that the white people actually you know, hate them, or dislike them, or are out to get em or something, and they don't seem to agree with me that the treatment, it's for one purpose and one purpose only which is cheap labor. And uh, it's uh, the way they fight the unions, you see to keep the wages down. Now Mr. Ni…Mr. Reagan has made it so, there're so many vacancies and so many, uh, so much unemployment, he's keeping wages down that way because there's about ten people for every job that opens.