Interview with Virginia Durr
QUESTION 11
INTERVIEWER:

DO YOU THINK THAT AT ANY POINT IN, IN THIS WHOLE, I MEAN IT'S A YEAR LONG THIS BOYCOTT, DO YOU THINK THAT OPINION CHANGED DURING THAT YEAR, IN, IN THE WHITE COMMUNITY? WE KNOW THAT THE BLACK COMMUNITY JUST KEPT GOING, BUT DID THE WHITE COMMUNITY GET HARDER, OR DID THEY GET MORE SYMPATHETIC, DID THEY CHANGE AT ALL?

Virginia Durr:

Well, I would like to say that they changed after they knew they were going to Atlanta, but they didn't change and that's when they changed minus the federal penitentiary, it would never have changed unless the federal government accepted and unless the federal government, I mean the fact that uh King had the movement and the fact that Mr. Nixon had the movement and the fact that the movement grew, certainly influenced the whole country, but it would never have changed in my opinion unless uh, the federal courts had stepped in and told ‘em well either you do this or you go to jail and that was a simple answer they had. It wasn't a question of debate, you, it was the Supreme Court of, you know, my brother-in-law, Justice Black, was on the court. And he came from Alabama, for forty years they wouldn't invite him back to Alabama, he was an absolute outcast and pariah, and uh they, well it's just a question of law and order. If the courts hadn't stepped in, I think we'd still be struggling.