Interview with Virginia Durr
QUESTION 1
INTERVIEWER:

LOOKING TO HAVE YOU DESCRIBE FOR US MONTGOMERY IN THE 1950S A TYPICAL SEGREGATED CITY.

Virginia Durr:

Well you realize I had been gone from Montgomery since 19—I'd been gone from Alabama since 1933. And we didn't go back until uh 19, uh 51, and so at that time Montgomery hadn't changed at all it was just exactly as it was uh, in the beginning. Uh, it was absolutely segregated and uh everybody took it for granted and uh the thing that I have to tell you uh and anybody truthful will have to tell you is that if you are born into a system that's wrong, whether it's a slave system or whether it is a segregated system, you take it for granted. And uh I was born into a system it was segregated and uh denied blacks the right to vote also denied women the right to vote, and I took it for granted, nobody told me any different nobody said that it was uh strange or unusual or it wasn't like other states.** And it really wasn't until I got to Washington that I began to realize how varied, a bunch of variance we were with the rest of the country and how very wrong the system was. So Montgomery, when I came back to it, it was like going back into my past, if you know what I mean.