Interview with Virginia Durr
QUESTION 24
INTERVIEWER:

AND AT THE ENDING WHEN IT WAS OVER DID, DID YOU FEEL EXHILARATED?

Virginia Durr:

Look, I felt not only exhilarated I was absolutely thrilled. Uh, I felt that, you know that here were people who had been treated, I thought, so badly, finally coming up out of the mud as it were and standing up for themselves. And I think that's one of the most thrilling things that can happen in human history is for people to finally stand up for themselves and stop being treated badly. Now, there's still a lot to do but this is the beginning, this is, and the fact it was woman that did it first, uh, didn't mean that the men didn't stand by her. And I just think for a whole race of people to suddenly decide that they're going to uh, rise up and uh, do something is just absolutely thrilling. I don't, it makes you feel like the, you know that human beings can't be held down, you can't beat ‘em down, you know that finally they gon rise up. Well, look you know, it's not, you said you were part Jewish, look how they were being beaten down by Hitler, but don't you think that a great many of em rose again? Well I do too. Well you see I'm from, blacks you know I'm not black but there are Southerners like I am we've lived in the same part of the country for three hundred more years, I have been on, you know, close terms with many of them. And when they rose up and began to show their manhood I felt that I myself was being… uh… enlighten—not enlightened, that's not the word, made bigger. You know, I was being made larger… I don't think I'm expressing it right but maybe somebody will understand what I'm trying to say.