Interview with Virginia Durr
QUESTION 26
INTERVIEWER:

I ACTUALLY WANT TO GO BACK A LITTLE EARLIER EVEN THAN, THAN THE BOYCOTT, WHICH WAS THE BROWN DECISION IN 1954. NOW DO YOU, DO YOU REMEMBER THE REACTION IN MONTGOMERY TO THAT DECISION? WERE THEY HORRIFIED?

Virginia Durr:

Uh, well they were indeed they uh, horrified all over the South with the terrible events that happened, as you know, you know they uh, before the Brown decision came in my husband and I were both called down to New Orleans for Jim Eastland and accused of overthrowing the government by forcing violence. And what they were actually trying to get at is the fact that my brother-in-law was on the Supreme Court and the Supreme Court was just about to issue the Brown decision, and so they got head—Jim Eastland was running for the Senate and he got headlined. And the paper saying "Relative to Justice Black in favor of Brown decision" or "Being tried by Senator Eastland for Communist affiliation" or some kind of crazy stuff. And uh, so Jim Eastland, was uh, see head of the, is in town security of the, so he, a group of us who had been working for integration for years and years and working for the vote for years and years since 1933 when Roosevelt was elected, Aubrey Williams, and uh, he had us down there and uh, he accused us of overthrowing the government by force and violence. And so uh, we, no, uh, it was, the whole thing was so crazy it was a, an informer from the Justice Department, a guy named Paul Crouch who accus—