Interview with Virginia Durr
QUESTION 27
INTERVIEWER:

I ACTUALLY THINK I CAN'T, I CAN'T REALLY USE… IT'S A GREAT STORY BUT IT'S GONNA CONFUSE PEOPLE A LOT. LET ME BRING YOU BACK TO THE BROWN DECISION ITSELF I MEAN…

Virginia Durr:

Well the Brown decision did get people very upset and the reason why I was telling you about Jim Eastland because that's one way he had of, you know fighting it making you think it was a communist decision, and putting the smear of communism on it, he could. But there was a, what happened was the, there was various reactions. And uh, people said that it's gonna be a boycott of the schools and it was in some places and then some people said there would be a boycott of the teachers, and there was in some places. Some people said the students were going to you know not come anymore or anyway. There was various reactions in various places. And then you know there were schools burnt down and bombed, and then don't you remember the picture of the little children going to school in New Orleans the women spitting. Well it was really a very painful time and I can tell you I sent my children off to school. I was able to do it because I had friends here in Boston actually who gave em scholarships, or got em scholarships but it was not my husband they were so mad at it was my brother-in-law, Justice Black. And they'd tell my children, "You tell your uncle we're not gonna do this and we're not gonna do that" and "You tell your uncle your teacher said this." Imagine a child thirteen or twelve years old and

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

OK WE'RE GOING TO CAMERA ROLL 205