Interview with Virginia Durr
QUESTION 34
INTERVIEWER:

YOU'RE SORT OF SAYING THAT THE, THAT THE, THE WHITE WOMEN THEN THEY WERE SUPPORTING AND THE BLACK WOMAN, THE BLACK WOMAN, THEY WERE LYING FOR EACH OTHER IS WHAT YOU'RE SAYING.

Virginia Durr:

Certainly. I mean black women were not saying that they were supporting the boycott, and white women were not saying that were taking their maids back and forth but they were both things and… In other words they were depending on each other the black women needed the money and the white women needed uh, the, the services, and wanted them anyway. And uh, I just think it was a tremendous kind of game they were playing. But I think that uh, and you may think I sound old fashioned but I really do actually believe that most of the bad feelings between groups, you know, I don't mean only the black and white, but ethnic groups, or religious groups. If you dig down deep enough, if you get down beneath the uh, uh, surface it's nearly always rests on somebody wanting to exploit somebody else and keeping them down so they can. And uh, all the groups who came to this country from England, I mean from Europe you know they were all treated very badly too. The only difference between the uh, groups that came over here the ethnic groups who came as immigrants and the blacks is the blacks didn't come willingly, and uh the other ones were looking for a better life and the blacks you see were brought over by force and violence as it were.