Interview with Marian Wright Edelman
QUESTION 47
HENRY HAMPTON:

Malcolm.

MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN:

Malcolm.

HENRY HAMPTON:

Change your life at all?

MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN:

Malcolm had the same kind of audacity, ah, that I think I had been taught by adults in very many different ways, all of my life. Because again, it had never occurred to me, either as a Black or as a woman, that I couldn't make a difference or that I couldn't be anything. And Malcolm sort of elevated that, ah, to a different level because he was blunt where King was tactful. They were both smart, ah, both extraordinarily eloquent and articulate. He was, he could, he could say the anger while King could, could, could, could do the, the softer, encouraging, persuasion, pushing, prodding, ah, but, ah, you know, he, ah, was a reinforcing, ah, person, ah, at a different time and at a, and, and responded to a different need in, in us who didn't, cause, you know, it was always hard to try to be half as good as Dr. King. Even though we believed in non violence it was also very good to have somebody vet, ah, the other side, ah, and there always need to be multiple voices with multiple strategies, ah, pursuing social change.

HENRY HAMPTON:

MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN:

I petered out, sorry.

HENRY HAMPTON:

That's fine.