Interview with Marian Wright Edelman
QUESTION 4
HENRY HAMPTON:

What were the problems left behind.

MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN:

The problems left behind for me as a lawyer and with my two colleagues in my office were hundreds, you don't want to do that, you want to get to the--

HENRY HAMPTON:

Start off with the problem after everyone left

MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN:

After every one left in the summer of '64, I and my two colleague lawyers were left with hundreds of cases that we had delayed but not tried, ah, and which we had to struggle to settle or to deal with. The poor Blacks of Mississippi were left with new pride, hope, the sense that they could, ah, overcome legal segregation, that the country was watching but they were also left with more poverty, ah, an inability to eat, ah, an inability to, to, to, ah, to have the skills and the tools they needed to take advantage of, of desegregating schools, ah, to take advantage of, ah, of new opportunities provided by the civil rights laws and we were left therefore with the challenge of seeing how we could begin to put into place, ah, the food and the nutri- and the health care and the income supports and the jobs, ah, that would enable those people who wanted a better life for their children and in fact to attain it. So, all the social and economic problems that underpinned the legal problems of segregation were left but at least we had done away with one huge termite.