Interview with Rev. Joseph Ellwanger
QUESTION 20
INTERVIEWER:

NOW, YOU WERE A PART OF THE, THE CLERGY THAT WENT TO, TO SELMA AND IN FACT, OTHER FOLK WHO UH, WENT TO SELMA FOR WHAT IS NOW CALLED TURN-AROUND-TUESDAY, WHICH WAS MARCH 9th, RIGHT AFTER BLOODY SUNDAY. WHERE WERE THE, THE WHITE SOUTHERN CLERGY MEMBERS AND, AND WHY DIDN'T THEY FEEL THE PULL TO COME? WE HEAR ABOUT THE NORTHERN CLERGYMEN COMING IN.

Rev. Joseph Ellwanger:

Well white southern clergy people were uh, in a very vulnerable position. The one white clergy person that I recall being in our uh, demonstration on Saturday, and I think he came back on that following Tuesday, uh, received so many personal threats when he returned to his parish, that uh, he fin—-he left within a matter of weeks from the parish. He simply couldn't take it and his, and his family couldn't take it psychologically. Uh, so there were, there was that kind of uh intimidation and that's uh, what almost every white person in the South felt uh, if they were to really go public. Uh, they might talk uh, in, small conversation in favor of change, but uh, taking action publicly was just uh, almost unthinkable on the part of most whites.