Interview with Harold Engstrom
QUESTION 18
INTERVIEWER:

ALSO VERY NICE. SPEAKING OF THE MEDIA, WHEN YOU TALKED, YOU MADE SOME VERY TELLING POINTS ABOUT HOW THE TELEVISION CAMERAS AFFECTED PEOPLE, AND I WONDERED IF YOU COULD GIVE US SOME EXAMPLES OF THAT?

Harold Engstrom:

Well, I had never been in the limelight. I had never been on Time, had my picture in Time magazine, or been on national television. So, and neither had most of the people in the roles of this crisis. But I was constantly amazed at how the human animal responds to the limelight. And some of my close associates, our segregationist member of the Board, he beamed. [laughter] He responded to very well to the opportunity to be on—in the limelight, and it later turned out, it fostered political ambitions. He became a representative in Congress. And it probably would never have happened if it had not been focus of national attention. And I guess even I responded favorably when some Navy buddy of mine calls me from California and said, well I saw you on television and your tie wasn't straight, or something like that. [laughter]