Interview with Harold Engstrom
QUESTION 25
INTERVIEWER:

DO YOU WANT TO TALK ABOUT THIS, "IF YOU HAVENT BEEN IN THE SOUTH" [unintelligible].

Harold Engstrom:

We are often thought of as being different, and stupid, about our feelings about what—our Southern heritage, about, talking about out feelings about the Civil War, a hundred years later, we're still—during the school crisis, we're still relating things to the Civil War. And I've often discussed with people from the north, and the east, and say, that there's no way you can understand what it means to be a southerner, and to talk about the Civil War, because America just doesn't think about losing a tragic, serious war, but the South lost a tragic, serious war. And we put the best of our people, and the best of our resources in it, and we suffered tremendous losses, in every way, and it's just such a different thing, to be in a country that has lost a serious war. Be like being in Japan, or being in Germany, being in the South, you living in a place that had lost a serious war. Now, fifty, thirty, years later in 1985, you don't find that so much a factor, but when, because we're really not so much southern, any more. With the interstate highways and the jet airplane, and the television, and of our businesses are doing business all over the United States and all over the world. We're not such a region, any more. But we were still a region, then.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

150 REMAINING ON 116.