Interview with Harold Engstrom
QUESTION 26
INTERVIEWER:

BUT I WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT TECHNICALLY WE DIDN'T HAVE A PROBLEM. SO, THIS SENSE OF THE SOUTH.

Harold Engstrom:

I'm often asked by people from other parts of the country about what it means to be a southerner, and why was–why do we keep talking about those feelings of the south, and why do we keep talking about the Civil War. And it is strange to them, but it's real, that we were living in a region of the country that was still suffering from a tragic loss, a tragic war, a hundred years previous. We were still paying the price of losing that tragic war. We lost our great-grandfathers, the finest of our, our intellect, the finest resources we had, our, our economy was destroyed, our, our confidence in ourselves, and our ability to solve problems in a rational way. And so the South, at that time, in the fifties, was still really, actually suffering from the loss of a tragic war, and those of you that live in a country that has never lost a tragic war, just cannot understand.