Interview with Harold Engstrom
QUESTION 3
INTERVIEWER:

WHILE WE'RE HAVING YOU DESCRIBE THINGS, COULD YOU TALK ABOUT CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL. AGAIN, WE'RE TALKING JUST ABOUT WHAT IT LOOKED LIKE—WHAT IT SEEMED—YOU WERE A GRADUATE YOURSELF?

Harold Engstrom:

Yes. Central High School was a point of pride in the community. Both in the structure, the location, the grounds, it was also a point of pride in the quality of the product. It was – we proudly said that we were rated, I think 21st, or 30th, or something, in a national rating on high schools over the whole country. Whether that's true or not, I don't know, but it was in Life magazine, or something, and, and we were very proud of that, and we—we were, as I said, we were constantly trying to improve it. All of the students in the community, all the white students in the community went to Central High School, up until the, the plan for integration. We built two new high schools, to accept our growth, but to also fit in to the plan of how the integration would work. One would be in the, the eastern, black community, and the other would be in the western, white community, and all of the integration in the initial stage, would be at Central High. But it was not because of any—anything except pride in Central High. Central High had always succeeded in everything else, we thought it would succeed in this.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

200 FEET IN TO ROLL 112.