Interview with Harold Engstrom
QUESTION 4
INTERVIEWER:

ABOUT THE ORIGINAL PLAN FOR DESEGREGATION IN LITTLE ROCK THAT WAS STARTED RIGHT AFTER THE SUPREME COURT DECISION, IF YOU COULD DESCRIBE THAT AND HOW THAT, HOW THAT WAS DEVELOPED, AND HOW IT CHANGED, TO BECOME THE PLAN THAT WAS PUT INTO EFFECT IN '57.

Harold Engstrom:

All right. After the 1954 decision, about segregation and integration, the – the school board was obligated to respond. It was news, it was a change, in other words, the Constitution was changed in a sense. And so we made a statement that we would comply, and that we would comply as soon as we heard what the Court had promised to give us, which was some guidance, as to progress or rate of change or – or what, and then when we got the "all deliberate speed" decision, we came up with what was later called the Blossom Plan. And I guess that Mr. Blossom himself, the superintendent, should get credit in name for the plan, because it was probably mostly his plan. At first, we started to integrate several grades, I believe we integrated – we planned originally, I'll stop right here. Didn't we plan originally to integrate from the first grade?