Interview with Charles Epps
QUESTION 14
SAM POLLARD:

Give us an example, an analogy you used is Swahili.

CHARLES EPPS:

Well, ah, there was at one time a demand by the high school students in Washington, there was a great interest in Swahili. They wanted it incorporated in the, in the curriculum and there were some people, students at Howard who wanted it also. But, ah, I had difficulty finding summer students, stu- students who work in my office during the summer who could use English properly and who could, ah, ah, count accurately. So that English and mathematics, you see, would be, in my estimation much more useful than Swahili. So that I wouldn't want to see Swahili become a, a second language until they had mastered English first. That's the language that they need. When you go out to hire a secretary you want a secretary be able to handle, ah, English properly. And that's a problem in getting a good secretary. And anybody who's tried to hire one today knows that. And if you want an accountant you want someone who can handle the figures properly. Not someone who speak, speaks Swahili so, so I think that would be, a, a low priority and only after you had mastered the, the essentials. In other words the reading, writing and arithmetic. Let's have that first and then the other things can come.

SAM POLLARD:

OK, cut. Thank you. Very good.



CHARLES EPPS:

Good, I also. Let me ask a question. Can I also tie that in with Cheke[SIC] today because they had the same--

SAM POLLARD:

No.

CHARLES EPPS:

You don't want to go that far, OK.

CHARLES EPPS:

Among the students demands in 1968.