Interview with Charles Epps
QUESTION 19
SAM POLLARD:

When you were watching the student takeover on television, what was your sense? What did you feel? Did you think that for that one moment that the school could fall apart and things could fall apart at Howard University, that the polarization would be so great that the school would never be able to continue?

CHARLES EPPS:

No, when I watched the, the student takeover I thought that it was unfortunate that they were wasting a lot of time that would have been better spent in the study halls, in the library, or in the classroom. And I realized also that in three years, none of those students who were, who were the instigators of that strike, would be there. You know in four years the student population turns over and the leaders of that strike would pass on to other things. The University has to persist. It's been there now 122 years. And, no matter what happens, in any one particular year, the institution has to, has to survive and goes on and it did. And the university survived that, ah, that, ah, '68 period very well, intact. And as a matter of fact I think it came out even stronger than it was before. Because there was good out of the, out of this, it wasn't all bad. It was good. They, the students and the faculty, ah, did develop a, a better communication and the Administration too. So that those three entities had a better means of communication after this, after the strike than they did before.

SAM POLLARD:

I'm going to ask you that question again. Let's cut. I can't have you go past after the takeover because were not, you know.



SAM POLLARD:

Dean Epps, watching the takeover on television, at any time did you think that the school was going to be so polarized that it would just, everything would just fall apart at Howard that there would be no Howard no more? What was your reaction?

CHARLES EPPS:

Well, as I watched the, ah, the strike on television, I, I was very concerned about it in the sense that I thought that it was a lot of energy and time being wasted. I think the students would have been much better served if they'd put their energy into the classroom and to the study hall and into their books. But, in either case, ah, ah, I believe that as a result of that there was better communication among the students, the faculty and the administration. So that there was something positive that, that evolved.

SAM POLLARD:

Let's cut.