Interview with Charles Epps
QUESTION 31
SAM POLLARD:

Dean Epps, during the takeover, the students were given a lot of notoriety, a lot of press, I mean, and the administration and the faculty wasn't looked at too well. What was your reaction to what was going on?

CHARLES EPPS:

Well, I, as one viewed the entire process the strike as a process it becomes rather disconcerting to a faculty member because of what's happening. The, the press, as you know, seems to enjoy the--

SAM POLLARD:

You can't say that.

CHARLES EPPS:

When one looks at the, the strike as a process, ah, it becomes rather disconcerting for a faculty member or for a member of the administration because the press, it seems, ah, enjoy the confrontation and have no interest in seeing it resolved. The, the students of course are there they are absolutely confident about their own positions, ah, they are, they want immediate solutions. They, they, they're not, ah, ah, amenable to a resolution over a period of time. They want it done immediately. And if you take someone who's 20 years-old who is, ah, who has a television camera on him every evening at 6 o'clock and has a microphone in front of his mouth and there's a reporter standing there writing down every word, they become very difficult to, ah, to negotiate with. And therefore you have these non-negotiable demands emerging. And, ah, I'm sure they get a great deal of satisfaction out of seeing themselves on, on the press. The faculty and administration have to be restrained under those same circumstances. And in fact they have difficulty getting their message over to the media because the media is interested in what the students have to say. So, I, I think that on balance the, the faculty and the administration are at a disadvantage always in these kind of situations because the press regards the student as the, as the hot item of news. And that was true in this, in 1968 in this situation too.

SAM POLLARD:

Cut.