Interview with Charles Epps
QUESTION 35
SAM POLLARD:

Dean Epps, what did your parents tell you about how you were going to make it at the time as a Negro in America? And what was your reaction to the, what the students were doing in '68?

CHARLES EPPS:

I have very vivid memories of my parents telling me that, ah, life was not always fair and because of segregation and discrimination that I would face, I had to work twice as hard as the White man to get to the same point. And I accepted that and in fact I found it to be true in life. Education was my ticket out of the ghetto and I believe it applies equally to the students of 1968 and I think that their most important mission while they're in college was to get the best possible education to prepare themselves. And I think to some extent that strike of course was wasting their time when they could have used that time and energy to more useful pursuits. I understand the problem that they were facing but I think they're impatience is what drove them to take the strike action. Whereas, ah, negotiation and more peaceful, ah, discussion of those matters would have produced the same result, I'm sure in time.

SAM POLLARD:

Cut. Thank you very much.