Interview with Darrell Evers
QUESTION 4
INTERVIEWER:

OK, DARRELL, TELL ME ABOUT THE GAMES AND WHAT THEY MEANT TO YOU AT THAT AGE.

Darrell Evers:

Well, the game, at eight years old, you know, kids like to play a lot of games so to me it was, it was army and combat. And my father used to see that in me, so he made a self protection game, says, "OK, we're going to pretend, like if someone approached you, what would you do?" And I said, "Well, I guess I'd run." And he said, "No, if, if you heard a loud noise or you heard a menacing sound, I think the best thing we should do is fall on the floor and get under cover, get under a table, or get under our beds, you know, so that we're not hit or hurt by that." And I thought that was, was a great game, you know. And I lived my life as a game in that sense because it was, it was more of, you know, it was more exciting than, than just, oh my god, you know, what's going to happen, you know, people are after us and everything like that. So, that was, that was a—it was a nice game that he played with us. And it was, it brought in a whole new feeling in my life, you know, when I was, you know, at that age, because at, at first I had the, the free reign of the lots. I could run and play anywhere I wanted to play. I could do, not anywhere, but within a certain area. But then the area, the boundaries of, of playing were cut down, and I couldn't understand why. And later on, I found out, you know, from Medgar, that those boundaries were there to protect me and I really wanted to know, well, what was I being protected from? You know, why did I need to be protected? What did I do to anyone? I did not do anything to anyone. And he said, "Well, there are some people who just don't understand you, even the way that you are, just as a human being, just because of your color, you know." And that was something that I found very difficult to, to understand, so naturally I felt like a caged person. You know, you can only go so far. And, to be able to go and visit my grandparents with my father and my mother, you know, was like such a joy because there was so much freedom. It was in the country and we could run anywhere we wanted. We didn't have to have that feeling of, of entrapment. We didn't have to have that feeling of being in a boundary. And I guess freedom is a key word there, because it's something that most kids know, something that most eight-year-olds or any age, as a matter of fact, knows, that, that it feels good to be free. It feels good not to be pigeonholed. And—

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THIS WILL BE TAKE THREE.