Interview with Darrell Evers
QUESTION 7
INTERVIEWER:

OK, DARRELL, TELL ME THE STORY. THIS IS AFTER YOUR FATHER'S DEATH, AND YOU'RE IN THE HOUSE WITH PEOPLE.

Darrell Evers:

Well, I remember now, being in the house after, the day after the death of my father, and this overwhelming grief that was in the house. A number of people had come by to comfort my mother and comfort our family. And there was just a lot of, a lot of grief, because so many people loved Medgar, and you know, he was so respected, you know, throughout, throughout the country, and especially in, in Mississippi. And it was a little bit too much for an eight-year-old at that time. I'm talking about myself, 'cause I have the nature of being a light, and—a light person, a person who just felt free and felt love, you know, and, and grief was very alien to me. My father, I felt, was in peace, and I felt that he was finally resting, you know, because there was so much pressure on him before the day, you know, that he died. And there was just a lot of grief that I couldn't relate to too much of because I knew that he was taken care of. And, I was outside riding the bike trying to forget about what had just happened, and I was stopped and someone said, "Well, why are you, why are you playing," you know, "Why are you, why aren't you in the house? Why aren't you with everyone, and why, why are you playing?" To me it was, I was like, "Why are you asking that question," you know, "I know where my father is, I've had a deep feeling and experience with my father, and I know that he's taken care of, and I know that he was a good and a great man, and very few, you know, who are like him, and so, I know that he's taken care of." And you know, that was the feeling that I wanted to relate to that person who asked me that question. I forgot what we were going to say [unintelligible]. For one thing, as a kid, I never liked to dress up …

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THIS WILL BE TAKE SIX.