Interview with Darrell Evers
QUESTION 9
INTERVIEWER:

START AGAIN AND TELL ME, YOU KNOW, AT MY FATHER'S FUNERAL IN WASHINGTON.

Darrell Evers:

OK. At my father's funeral in Washington, that was a very sad moment for me because you know, it was, it was an acknowledgement that the actual body that I used to hug, the actual being that I used to, you know, expect to come home, was really going to be gone. Because once you, you see the casket closed, and you see it lowered, it's, it's very, it's very powerful. And no matter how much love and comfort that I knew that he was in, I still missed the physical part. I still missed hugging him and holding him, and also at that time, I was, I'm not very much—I don't like to dress up that much so it was hard for me to get dressed and be somewhat, you know, in happy spirits. I guess that's not the type of feeling that you have at a funeral, and I definitely wasn't happy, but just to add on the fact that I had to get dressed, and I didn't particularly like to dress up as a young kid, and at the same time, you know, on the sad occasion that my father was being buried, was—it was a lot for me. And I think that was one of the first times that I, I actually did cry very hard and very strong and I really let that flood come out, because it was something that needed to come out, and something that you just can't, you know, think everything's all right…