Interview with Myrlie Evers
QUESTION 24
INTERVIEWER:

OK, SO TALK TO ME ABOUT DESEGREGATION, WHAT IT MEANT IN TERMS OF WANTING AN EDUCATION AND IN TERMS OF YOUNG PEOPLE.

[unintelligible]

Myrlie Evers:

Medgar saw the desegregation of the schools in Mississippi as a very, very important thing to the growth and advancement of black people as well as the state. He was committed to that. He saw it in the sense that education was one of the tools that blacks had to increase their standard of living and to take their rightful places in society, and to be able to compete. He felt, as the rest of us did, that there would be no separate but equal schools, that the system would not allow equality as such. Therefore, it was necessary to go through the courts to break that ruling down and to see that we could go to all of the schools where we could have the best education possible that the state presented for its people. On the other hand, there was another aspect of Medgar's feeling about the need for desegregated schools. Beyond the study, the theory, there was the human element, that it would provide young people a chance to work together and not only to learn about subject matter and what-not, but to be able to learn about each other, therefore understanding each other, and hopefully, over generations, be able to work together as human beings and not see black or white. He was committed to that to the point where he was the first person, I should say we were, to file to desegregate the schools in Jackson, Mississippi. That suit was known as Darrell Evers Versus the State of Mississippi.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THIS WILL BE SEVENTEEN.

[unintelligible]

Myrlie Evers:

—but, but I'm, I'm staying up with what's now and, and I can't forget, but it gets—