Interview with Myrlie Evers
QUESTION 44
INTERVIEWER:

NO, JUST LIVING WITH THAT THREAT THAT WHOLE, WHAT IT MEANS IN TERMS OF YOUR LIVES.

Myrlie Evers:

I can't say that Medgar, our children, or myself had what one would call a normal life. We lived under the constant threat of danger to us. Medgar was an absolute, marvelous father. He could talk to the children and tell them what was happening, explain to them, and he devised a game with them where they decided where was the safest place in the house to hide if something happened. The children made a decision with their father that the bathtub was. They could not understand everything that was happening. They were well aware that their father's life was in danger, and at their young ages, three, eight and nine, they worried constantly about that. They also realized that our lives were in danger as well. We were followed…

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THIS WILL BE TAKE THIRTY-SIX. SPEED…MARKING.

Myrlie Evers:

To be born black and to live in Mississippi was to say that your life wasn't worth much, in that particular point in time. Medgar knew full well when he assumed the position of field director for the NAACP that there were going to be threats and that his life would possibly be taken from him. But certainly during the point of time when the economic boycotts were so successful, and we were having rallies every day and every night, it became very evident that Medgar was a target because he was the leader. The whole mood there of white Mississippians was to eliminate Medgar Evers and the problem would have been solved, there would be no more uprisings and, and—from the blacks in that community. How wrong they were. But of course, it affected Medgar's and my life, and our children's lives, profoundly. I must say that as any couple would argue, we had our arguments, but we also knew that whenever he left that house, that we may never see each other again, that it was necessary for us to touch base any number of times by phone with each other, if no more than to reassure each other that the other was all right. We made a pact. Medgar and I said we would never part angry, and as a result of that we decided that regardless of how angry we were, we would always kiss each other before parting. And we did that, even at times when I think we perhaps would like to have walked away from each other in anger. Our children did not have—

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THIS WILL BE TAKE THIRTY-SEVEN.