Interview with Myrlie Evers
QUESTION 7
INTERVIEWER:

SITTING ON THE CHICKEN WIRE BEING IN THE BACK OF THE BUS, WHAT THAT MAKES YOU FEEL, HOW THAT FEELING KIND OF IGNITES A SORT OF RESPONSE TO ALL THE—

Myrlie Evers:

Sitting in the back of the bus in Vicksburg really brought out a number of emotions that perhaps I wasn't even aware of at that particular time. I was aware of the anger. I was aware of the frustration of not knowing exactly what to do to change it, and being frustrated because there seem [sic] to have been no effort on the adults to do anything about it. Also, living in that kind of society, having to walk miles past a school, being delegated to the back of the bus has a tendency to make one feel inferior, even though you certainly fight that feeling. The—the system makes you feel inferior and you know yourself that you aren't, and, and there's that struggle within yourself to, at least with me, to prove to myself and everybody else that I wasn't inferior, and search for some way to say to that system that indeed I was not. But as I said my family life was that where we were told not to—I was told not to rock the boat. I moved, my grandmother and I moved, into the house with my aunt, who lived in a very mixed block of houses—a couple of blocks. On one side there were the blacks and across the street there were the whites, but never the twain shall meet. I mean we, we simply did not cross the street to visit, to talk to each other. But as children, regardless of color, you come together and, and you do find some way of playing together. There was a little girl, a little white girl across the street from my aunt's house, and the two of us would, would go up the block a few feet and play where our parents couldn't, couldn't see us.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

THIS WILL BE TAKE FOUR.