Interview with Willie Felder
QUESTION 10
SAM POLLARD:

Tell me about that little situation with your colleagues while you listened to Jesse's speech.

WILLIE FELDER:

OK, we, you know, Jesse's speech included some, some real rhythmic phrases and, and the particular one of calling "the nation-time peace" was very good, except that I doubt very seriously whether any of the Michigan delegation, or the majority of them, heard, really cared about that call at that moment. For, you see, we had been excluded from input in the framing of the national agenda. We had been excluded from having special privileges to include our concerns in the discussions on the assembly floor. And, ah, that delegate body consisted of some 65% or better of organized labor membership. The UAW and other international unions. And, ah, and, ah, these, these delegates had abundance of experiences in collective bargaining and winning contracts or socioeconomic benefits for Black families as well as other. And to have excluded that talent from a Black family was an insulting situation and was intolerable. And it led to some other situations as you know.

SAM POLLARD:

Let's cut. Let's move on to something new.