Interview with Willie Felder
QUESTION 15
SAM POLLARD:

OK, why did you remain with the rest of the Mili- Michigan delegation and decide not to walk?

WILLIE FELDER:

I had a very, very, ah, ah, wracking decision to make and it wasn't easy for me to make that decision, ah, to stay. But, I had reviewed the document, and, most of the ingredients in the document went to issues, in my judgment, that were far more important to the Black family of this country than to just pick up my marbles and go home because somebody had kicked me in the behind and ordered me out, in essence, by denying me the open right of participation. And, ah, for example, the, you know, the, the labor movement, we were all about wages, ah, for the under- ah, underprivileged, and day care, and, and health care, we were all about, in the UAW, dismantling discriminatory practices in management, and that's what the National Black Assembly agenda advocated also, and so these things seemed to me were weighing factors in my decision and others' decision to stay and, ah, course it wasn't a popular position to take, it was misunderstood by many, but I think, at this point in time, looking back, it was worth it.