Interview with Willie Felder
QUESTION 17
SAM POLLARD:

Did they do anything at the point that you stayed and they walked out?

WILLIE FELDER:

Of course not. They, well, they were disgruntled about it, and then my own constituency was unhappy about it because they did not understand at that time, ah, but, you see, we had UAW officials out of Illinois, Ohio, and other states who also, although they were with their states, they were officials in my organization, and they remained with their delegations, you know, because it really was not affected by that and they dispute. It, it was more a--


SAM POLLARD:

If you could just do that one again for us, why did you remain with the Michigan delegation, ah, when, ah, with the Michigan that had decided not to walk out?

WILLIE FELDER:

When the, when the 65% or better of the delegate body decided to walk out, you must remember that they were my constituents, they were labor, and I am labor, and it was a very, very painful decision for me, ah, to have to make, and that was to remain in the session to its conclusion. It was very difficult. I was executive director of a major, a sub-major department.