Interview with Willie Felder
QUESTION 1
SAM POLLARD:

OK, Willie, just, let's go back to 1972, Gary, Indiana. Describe what it was like when you first got to Gary and you first went to the convention hall, and all these different people from all over the country, you know, militants, grass-roots people. What was your reaction to what you were seeing?

WILLIE FELDER:

I had a--

SAM POLLARD:

You need to include "My reaction was--"

WILLIE FELDER:

My reaction to, OK, OK, OK.

SAM POLLARD:

I'm sorry, if you could start over.

WILLIE FELDER:

Is that OK?

SAM POLLARD:

I'm ready.


SAM POLLARD:

OK, we've gone back to 1972. Give me a reaction when you first go to Gary, when you first got to the convention hall. All these people from all over the country, militants, people from the South, you know, people from your delegation. What was your reaction to what you were seeing at Gary?

WILLIE FELDER:

I had a very, very good reaction. I'm sorry, we've better go back to, I'm sorry about--

SAM POLLARD:

My reaction--

WILLIE FELDER:

Yes. You want to just?

SAM POLLARD:

Yeah, you just--

WILLIE FELDER:

OK. My reaction to having seen so many people from so many different parts of the country, ah, such as Jesse Jackson, Baraka, Basil Paterson, and a whole host of other Black movers and shakers in that era, was one of great happiness and joy that they had seen or felt enough about that assembly or the calling of that assembly to come on in and, and be a part of that 4000 or better Black persons from all over the country. And it was a mixture of successful and professional versus blue-collar, if I may use that term in the Black family, versus even those who were unemployed or jobless found a way to get there from their various states. To me, that was one of the most, ah, ah, moving sights that I can recall in my h- career.