Interview with Robert Finley
QUESTION 4
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Can you go back just one more time and give me a sense of the bar being there with the shotgun also. And also that maybe that wasn't altogether needed, the shotgun, you know, that people knew you. You can start.

ROBERT FINLEY:

As a result of, of many people knowing me and my setting on the stoop with this, ah, 16 gauge shotgun, ah, I felt at, at the moment that I began this act that, ah, I was doing the c- correct thing. I'm defending my property, local neighborhood, but as, actually ,as the time went on I, ah, saw the way the reception, saw the way the activity was that actually I was not in danger, not at all, not, not one bit. And this, this is quite surprising when you see people acting up and, and I know the capabilities of my neighborhood. They can, as I say good, bad and ugly. And, ah, they sure suddenly showed me that well Bob, you're a part of this neighborhood and you're going to be here. And, ah, that clearly showed me that I guess I'm in business here. And really this I think in any businessman appreciate the fact that, ah, customers say, hey this is, ah, this is where I like to come. I have people again and say, "Bob you know I, I don't go anywhere but here to have a drink." I have customers come from Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti, and I had the feeling that they were living, ah, on the north end or somewhere in the city limits. And people have been, he said, "You know I drive 25, 30 miles to come here and have a drink."