Interview with Dr. Grant Friley
QUESTION 32
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

So can you just tell me again, what, what was the most painful part of this week for you?

GRANT FRILEY:

The most painful part for me as a police officer was the feeling of frustration, ah, being a Black man, being on the job and, and, and, and having people despise and hate me because I was a police officer, and to know that those very people, many of them looked up to me prior to the insurrection and after the insurrection was over, I guess I was OK, but during that time I was called every kind of damnable name that you can think of, and I was treated unfairly by the very people that, that I was part of. It bothered me to know that I could be hated that much just because I had a uniform on, and it was that, that, that feeling that, that the people really don't know what, what good police officers are all about, and I really thought I was a good police officer.

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Could you start and say--if they hated you that much--

GRANT FRILEY:

If, if they could hate me that much, I had a feeling how much they must have hated my fellow White officer. To hate me as much as they hated me, they had to despise everything about him. And, ah, I think that if there was any sniping going on, ah, the sniper did not say - let's ignore that Black officer, ah, let's shoot at the White officer. Ah, they hated all of us.