Interview with Paula Giddings
QUESTION 10
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Well, just Compress the story, who was there and then how it affected you.

PAULA GIDDINGS:

So, we're going to start with the writers' conference.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

That's right Talk about the writer's conference and how it affected you personally and how you brought it back to Howard.

PAULA GIDDINGS:

In 1967, all of at Howard were very much influenced by a very important writer's conference that was organized by John Killens at Fisk University in which people like Nicky Giovani and Sonya Sanchez and Haki Madhubuti spoke. They had recently been published by Dudley Randall, who then owned Broadside Press, and that was part of this whole Black power movement was reflected in that conference. That was, had a great affect on, on writing and on the writing at Howard, the students at Howard and the literary magazine. Now the Afro American Review. We looked at the role of writers very differently. You know, until the late '60s, writers, Black writers for the most part, even though they were very good and racially conscious, for the most part wrote for White people and White audiences. The role now was changing with the function of the Black writer was. And so did the material itself. So, by the time we had something called the Afro American Review, there was a great deal of, of critical analysis of Black politics, of Black poetry and exclamation points and bold face and a very different sensibility in the magazine.